the spanish aquisition

Sherry Wines

Sherry is an Anglicisation of Jerez, the central town in the south-west corner of Spain. In it's time it has been invaded by Ottomans, Romans, Huns and the Moors. While these left some splendid architectural traces and pretty ceramic tile work, 400 years or British merchant dominance has celebrated, entrenched and refined the production of the diverse group of lightly fortified wines which today we call "sherry".

Sherries come in sweet and dry, rich and elegant styles. They're made from both brown and predominantly white grapes. But what they all share is an extended period of barrel maturation (4 years minimum for decent wines) in a solera system, and fortification with three or more degrees of clean, neutral alcohol.

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Delgado Zuleta, Sanlúcar de Barrameda, D.O. Jerez

Manzanilla is the appellation name for a Fino sherry which is raised at Sanlúcar de Barrameda, a relatively cool, humid seaside village. The resultant sherry has a definite tang of the sea, and perhaps a suggestion of camomile flower (manzanilla is Spanish for camomile). Much finer, and more delicate than finos from Jerez, inland, and usually bottled at about 15% alcohol.

DZ is a manzanilla pasada, meaning it has been aged for a relatively long time (8 years, compared to manzanilla standard of about 4 ½). The wine is bottled, however, before the flor yeast can die off, thus avoiding any amontillado characters. The oyster shell suggestion in normal manzanilla becomes a richer scent of abalone, and the wine has a fabulous builders' lime streak which directly reflects the flavour of the chalky 'albariza' soils in which it's grown.

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Sanchez Romate, D.O. Jerez

Sherry is an Anglicisation of Jerez, the central town in the south-west corner of Spain. In it's time it has been invaded by Ottomans, Romans, Huns and the Moors. While these left some splendid architectural traces and pretty ceramic tile work, 400 years or British merchant dominance has celebrated, entrenched and refined the production of the diverse group of lightly fortified wines which today we call "sherry".

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Sanchez Romate V.O.R.S range, D.O. Jerez

Sherry is an Anglicisation of Jerez, the central town in the south-west corner of Spain. In it's time it has been invaded by Ottomans, Romans, Huns and the Moors. While these left some splendid architectural traces and pretty ceramic tile work, 400 years or British merchant dominance has celebrated, entrenched and refined the production of the diverse group of lightly fortified wines which today we call "sherry".

These are wines which bear the new V.O.R.S. appellation tag - Vinum Optimum Rarum Signatum, which colloquially = Very Old Rare Sherry. Classified as 'over 30 years' age', they are more likely to be based on material no less than 40 years of age. Each have been skilfully freshened and they really dance!

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Gutierrez Colosia, el Puerto de Santa Maria

While all will be familiar with Finos from Jerez, and also from Sanlucar de Barremeda, where from they are called Manzanilla, few will have had the elusive Third Fino, which is from el Puerto de Santa Maria, and is called Fino del Puerto. Puerto de Santa Maria is down the coast from Sanlucar, roughly level with Jerez and faces Cadiz across an estuary bay. Gutierrez Colosia are the only remaining commercially bottled example of authentic Fino del Puerto. 

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Cayetano del Pino, Jerez, D.O. Jerez

Cayetano del Pino

Cayetano del Pino is a family business dating to the mid-1880s, it has since become an 'Almacenista' – an ageing warehouse, procuring and nurturing sherries in small lots for re-sale down the track with enhanced character. Sanchez Romate purchase and bottle the annual output of these tiny soleras, one each of 15 and 5 butts, with minimal filtration.

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