the spanish aquisition

SHERRY OVERVIEW

The Sherry Region

Sherry is an Anglicisation of Jerez, the central town in the south-west corner of Spain. In it’s time it has been invaded by Ottomans, Romans, Huns and the Moors. While these left some splendid architectural traces and pretty ceramic tile work, 400 years or British merchant dominance has celebrated, entrenched and refined the production of the diverse group of lightly fortified wines which today we call “sherry”.
Sherries come in sweet and dry, rich and elegant styles. They’re made from both brown and predominantly white grapes. But what they all share is an extended period of barrel maturation (4 years minimum for decent wines) in a solera system, and fortification with three or more degrees of clean, neutral alcohol.

Sherry is an Anglicisation of Jerez, the central town in the south-west corner of Spain. In it’s time it has been invaded by Ottomans, Romans, Huns and the Moors. While these left some splendid architectural traces and pretty ceramic tile work, 400 years or British merchant dominance has celebrated, entrenched and refined the production of the diverse group of lightly fortified wines which today we call “sherry”.
Sherries come in sweet and dry, rich and elegant styles. They’re made from both brown and predominantly white grapes. But what they all share is an extended period of barrel maturation (4 years minimum for decent wines) in a solera system, and fortification with three or more degrees of clean, neutral alcohol.Sherry is produced in the province of Andalusia, in the south-west corner of Spain, in a quadrilateral area running north-west up the coast from Cadiz, near the Gibraltar Straight, and diagonally inland. It is centred around the inland town of Jerez de la Frontera, so named as it was often the “frontier” of various battles for land-ownership and culturaleconomic supremacy. Like it or not, the history of sherry is inextricably linked with war. British soldiers invaded, caused havoc, drank lots and stayed. British merchants established trade links, bought bodegas (wineries), formed partnerships with Spanish Lords and Dons and conducted trade on behalf of themselves and the Jerezanos.  The Sherry region today is owned and managed by a complex Colonial amalgam – Spanish and British namesintermingle at every level of ownership management and promotion. Although it’s a Spanish wine, geographically speaking, the weird mix of economic vested interest and mad passion for a very particular wine by the British has undoubtedly been instrumental in keeping the region economically viable and a part of the world market in fine wine.

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